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The recent Paris attacks have left the 'civilised world' exposed to accusations of dehumanising policies. One of our best achievements, technology, is at the centre of this exposure - and we are all 'in its' grip, whether we choose to... more
The recent Paris attacks have left the 'civilised world' exposed to accusations of dehumanising policies. One of our best achievements, technology, is at the centre of this exposure - and we are all 'in its' grip, whether we choose to admit it or not. Here is why.
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This chapter focuses on the Northern Irish political-cultural context of cinematic tourism to consider how the televised adaptation of R.R. Martin’s Game of Thrones informs territorialised claims over tourist flows in the province’s... more
This chapter focuses on the Northern Irish political-cultural context of cinematic tourism to consider how the televised adaptation of R.R. Martin’s Game of Thrones informs territorialised claims over tourist flows in the province’s filmed locations. Defined by folk legends and gifted with natural riches, these Northern Irish sites are implicated both in World Heritage complexities and the ethno-national sensibilities of Ireland’s history. The study examines how the TV series’ filmed sites are being ‘reconfigured’ (interpreted) as Irish cultural capital in websites regulated by transnational, Northern Irish and Irish e-tourist providers. Drawing on combinations of these filmed Northern Irish places’ heritage matrix (their legends, fantastic-literary and real-natural imagery) and the series’ multi-sensory content, e-tourist sites contribute to synergies between capitalism and nationalism. It is argued that Northern Ireland’s Games of Thrones mobilities market tourism’s quotidian events while also reiterating the nation’s sacred time and essentialised existence.
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The paper explores the socio-cultural dynamics of Greek demonstrations in 2011, suggesting that their function exceeds that of social movements as we know them. A form of what I term “simulacral thanatotourism,” including marches and... more
The paper explores the socio-cultural dynamics of Greek demonstrations in 2011, suggesting that their function exceeds that of social movements as we know them. A form of what I term “simulacral thanatotourism,” including marches and demonstrations to Greek cities in protest for austerity measures, actualised in this context a form of mourning about the end of Greece’s place in European polity. This mourning, which places Greece at the centre of a withering European democratic cosmos, inspires in today’s dystopian Greek Raum two conflicting forms of social action: one is geared towards consumption of the country’s political history in terms similar to those we examine as “tourism.” This symbolic consumption of history re-writes the European past from a Greek standpoint while simultaneously promoting relevant entrepreneurial initiatives—in particular, the global circulation of imagery linked to riots and protests, and thus the movement of the abject aspects of Greek culture in global...
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The chapter explores recent transmutations of belly dancing into a digital narrative that fuses the discourse of ‘travelling cultures’ with that of embodied, mobile technologies that define ethnographic work: video recording, participant... more
The chapter explores recent transmutations of belly dancing into a digital narrative that fuses the discourse of ‘travelling cultures’ with that of embodied, mobile technologies that define ethnographic work: video recording, participant observation and experiential associations with the studied subjects. Despite its numerous ethnic archaeologies, scholars recognise belly dancing’s late nineteenth‐century roots in the crafts of the market, the festival and the expos. Its performance by women and effeminised men symbolically connected it to ‘unholy’ sexualised mobilities and the white male gaze, but in late modern Western markets the style acquired a female consumer basis. Its origins in lowbrow ‘Oriental’ commercial cultures became pivotal in its insertion in the global markets of the Internet, where it continues to be advertised as an embodied, feminine and Oriental craft – markers of sinful reproduction and abject sexualities. Today, the ubiquitous narratives of gender and sexuali...
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The term ressentiment originates in Friedrich Nietzsche's (Leipzig, 1969/1887) historical analysis of morals and describes a constraining sociocultural condition that brews a feeling directed against powerful agents. Nietzsche's... more
The term ressentiment originates in Friedrich Nietzsche's (Leipzig, 1969/1887) historical analysis of morals and describes a constraining sociocultural condition that brews a feeling directed against powerful agents. Nietzsche's French terminology reflects the context in which he developed his theory (nineteenthcentury European concerns about civilization decline, and the nationalization of Franco–German political conflict). The German and French models of habitus rationalization served as an ideal type in Elias's Civilising ...
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What does 'globalization'mean for those who allegedly stand at the 'receiving end'of its messages? Do they truly stand at its receiving end only–or, are they partaking in it in covert ways? This paper proffers some... more
What does 'globalization'mean for those who allegedly stand at the 'receiving end'of its messages? Do they truly stand at its receiving end only–or, are they partaking in it in covert ways? This paper proffers some theoretical reflections on the nature of new cultural industries and the interplay of local, national and global resistances that they induce. It singles out a specific case in which the contingent generation of interdependencies between Hollywood film-making and the 'tourist industries' that emerge from Hollywood screening ...
The article explores the conditions that fostered an unlikely convergence between James Cameron’s Avatar (2009) media industry, his and his colleagues’ travel and activist pursuits in Brazil, and Chinese tourist planning. Focusing on one... more
The article explores the conditions that fostered an unlikely convergence between James Cameron’s
Avatar (2009) media industry, his and his colleagues’ travel and activist pursuits in Brazil, and Chinese
tourist planning. Focusing on one of the film’s simulated landscape markers, Cameron’s collaborative
composition of an audiovisual “Pandorapedia” and his documentary on his Amazonian
travels, it debates how cinematic tourism assists in reconfigurations of utopian visions as tourist
markers. The particular utopian icon that connected such disparate projects as those of movie making
and its digital popular extensions to the generation of tourism in Chinese world heritage sites was that
of the fictional “Hallelujah” or “Floating” Pandora Mountains. Highlighting meeting points between
semiotechnological assemblages (world “languages,” music, and visual technologies) and human
artwork (acting, audiovisual creativity, and activism) it outlines how (a) postmodernist combinations
of art travel and tourist commodification relocate into postnational environments but (b) do not lose
their regional relevance and applicability.
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This article deals with current re-dramatizations of crime and popular criminologies. It analyses key elements of the popular criminological imaginaries underpinning a recent and highly successful film—Catch Me If You Can—in order to... more
This article deals with current re-dramatizations of crime and
popular criminologies. It analyses key elements of the popular
criminological imaginaries underpinning a recent and highly
successful film—Catch Me If You Can—in order to tease out the
discursive, mythical and fabulist techniques by which it
communicates particular imaginations of crime. Additionally, the
article offers some conceptual and analytical anchors for
interpreting filmwork so that other popular representations might
be more easily situated within criminological analysis. We argue
that popular media portrayals of crime are highly effective in
sustaining particular conceptions of the interaction between crime and wider social conditions, and we explore four layers of discursive work through which this film communicates the causes and consequences of criminal behaviour.
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Rodanthi Tzanelli and Majid Yar examine Mediterranean and wider European policies on migration in light of their exclusionary and discriminatory tendencies. The current rhetoric and exclusionary practices are cementing of profoundly... more
Rodanthi Tzanelli and Majid Yar examine Mediterranean
and wider European policies on migration in light of their
exclusionary and discriminatory tendencies. The current rhetoric and exclusionary practices are cementing of profoundly differentiated rights to live, work and belong. They argue that the outsider status of migrants from the global East and South is reproduced in Europe through a range of patriarchal, racialized and nationalist cultural discourses that strip away rights and consign migrants to political, social and economic marginality.
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The World cup transcends the interests of culture and nations worldwide. Every 4 years, delegations from the four corners of the world compete for a month. The mass tourist demand an event of this caliber generates prompts policy makers... more
The World cup transcends the interests of culture and nations worldwide. Every 4 years, delegations
from the four corners of the world compete for a month. The mass tourist demand an event of this caliber
generates prompts policy makers and tourism scholars to devote considerable time in planning in
detail the infrastructure and service industry for the benefit of incomers. Unfortunately, in areas of the
world plagued by political instability, some groups may use the media events to communicate radical
messages to the state. For similar reasons many specialists have studied terrorist attack prevention in
the context of event management. This present article is based on the FIFA World Cup in Brazil 2014
to illustrate that terrorism and tourism have been historically intertwined.
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ABSTRACT. The repressive mechanisms of collective memory have received due attention in the social sciences, with scholars examining the ethics of remembering and forgetting and their political implications. This study focuses on episodes... more
ABSTRACT. The repressive mechanisms of collective memory have received due attention in the social sciences, with scholars examining the ethics of remembering and forgetting and their political implications. This study focuses on episodes that took place in a Northern Greek town in 2000 and 2003, when an Albanian student was twice denied the right to hold the Greek flag during a commemorative national parade. It is argued that this line of action against the student, representative of Greek attitudes towards immigrants in Greece, asserted the locality's participation in the Greek ‘imagined community’. This was made possible through a process of ‘forgetting’ the locality's history and the analogies this presents with the experience of contemporary immigration. Questioning the ethical implications of this collective decision, the article links regional micro-politics to nationalist discourses that originate in the European project itself.
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The suggestion that cinematic and literary production are prone to fashion is not new. One could argue, however, that the reality of the 21st century culture industry exceeds the expectations of readers and viewers, in so far as literary... more
The suggestion that cinematic and literary production are prone to fashion is not new. One could argue, however, that the reality of the 21st century culture industry exceeds the expectations of readers and viewers, in so far as literary fiction has become an organic part of cinematic production. It is well known and commented on that the current trend in filmmaking involves the adaptation, if not recreation, of best-selling novels (Dudley, 1992: 421; McFarlane, 1996; Stam, 1992; Bordwell, 1988).
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The first research phase of EDUMIGROM focused on background studies on education and ethnic relations in the domestic contexts of the project's target countries.
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Independent, Thursday 29th April. There is nothing more entertaining than watching pre-election campaigns and the cock-fighting that accompanies them: every side rushes to make last-minute amends to its programme and assure its followers... more
Independent, Thursday 29th April. There is nothing more entertaining than watching pre-election campaigns and the cock-fighting that accompanies them: every side rushes to make last-minute amends to its programme and assure its followers that they misunderstood what they heard in the news, read in newspapers or listened in a public speech.
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Yesterday night I opened my hotmail account to find a message from an old Greek friend with whom I shared my first journey to Britain about twelve years ago. My friend, a permanent resident now in her hometown of Kozani, is sending me... more
Yesterday night I opened my hotmail account to find a message from an old Greek friend with whom I shared my first journey to Britain about twelve years ago. My friend, a permanent resident now in her hometown of Kozani, is sending me emails with varied content. This message, the content of which was directed to a global audience of heritage lovers, both moved and angered me: its supplication to heritage readers was with regards to the return of the Elgin marbles to the Greek state.
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We are accustomed to think of movies as part of our leisure activities rather than terrains on which political battles are enacted. However, in a highly commercialised globe that has turned image and sound into pathways to political... more
We are accustomed to think of movies as part of our leisure activities rather than terrains on which political battles are enacted. However, in a highly commercialised globe that has turned image and sound into pathways to political inclusion and global recognition, films have become politicized arenas. Take movies that successfully promote global pilgrimage [7](fan tourism and other types of tourism) to filmed locales, making filmed regions and nation-states internationally famous.
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Political and economic analysts speak of an economic 'End Game [2]' for Greece. The country has now seen past this point, with disorganised riots and protests that put unemployed youth, pensioners, family breadwinners, union leaders,... more
Political and economic analysts speak of an economic 'End Game [2]' for Greece. The country has now seen past this point, with disorganised riots and protests that put unemployed youth, pensioners, family breadwinners, union leaders, anarchists and principled ideologues in the same boiling pot. Sociological explananda of 'social movement' are highly unstable in this context that is dominated by economic, political and social uncertainty.
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The UK has always been ethnically diverse with a population developing from complex historical migration patterns and periods of conflict, conquest, state formation, empire and decolonisation.
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The globally-acclaimed film looks back to the past from a futuristic standpoint to simulate an archetypal moral tale of developmental inequality. Is that a good thing?
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The paper comprises an aspect of a (British Academy) project on evolving understandings of heritage in the Northern urban centre of Thessaloniki, Greece.The paper reviews politically motivated definitions of ‘heritage’ based on erasures... more
The paper comprises an aspect of a (British Academy) project on evolving understandings of heritage in the Northern urban centre of Thessaloniki, Greece.The paper reviews politically motivated definitions of ‘heritage’ based on erasures or commoditisation of history, suggesting that such modifications conform to a European meta-narrative that prioritises Christian cosmological themes of suffering and spirituality. The ways these histories clash or collude with the living and evolving cultures of the city is explored. The author enacts a form of death travel (“thanatotourism”) in some of Thessaloniki’s inner areas to examine the role conceptions of “heritage” (Jewish, Ottoman, Turkish and Asia Minor) have in the production of the city’s global tourist image. Priority is given to an analysis of the author’s methodological tools – as a native ethnographer, an “auteur” and a tourist. It is suggested that these critical methodologies do not exist totally outside the cultural frame she analyses as a Western professional. Given its historic associations with Orientalist geographies (as a Northern Balkan city that joined Greece in the early twentieth century only to be swamped by refugees from the crumbling Ottoman empire), Thessaloniki’s multiculturalist archive is the site of historical trauma. It is significant that its once thriving “communities of practice”, exemplified by crafts such as those of chair-making or complementary therapy (as in the production of herbal remedies and concoctions), do not partake in the city’s tourist image. This has often encouraged the development of introversion or competitions that feed into nationalist agendas and play in the hands of those systemic centres (regional, national and transnational) that shape the country’s official historical records. Clashes of voluntary and involuntary tourist mobility are placed under sociological scrutiny – as a complex offshoot of regional policies, national miscommunications and systemic impositions at European level.
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Parading on Greek National Days used to be the quintessential celebration of Greek identity. In the age of austerity it has evolved into an arena of contestation of rituals Greeks used to take for granted....
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The paper examines Anatolítika glykà (Asia Minor sweets) and the craft of zacharoplastikí (sweet-making) in Thessaloniki, Greece’s main northern city. The continuum between sweet-makers and product explicates the development of... more
The paper examines Anatolítika glykà (Asia Minor sweets) and the craft of zacharoplastikí (sweet-making) in Thessaloniki, Greece’s main northern city. The continuum between sweet-makers and product explicates the development of zacharoplastikí – originally a colonial occupation, later a feminine craft of the domestic hearth – to a modern profession. Thessalonikiote sweet-making and glykà develop as a travel narrative by obscuring their Eastern associations. Zacharoplastikí’s professionalization was assisted by the employment of spectacular representational techniques. This is today communicated on the websites of its five biggest zacharoplasteío (patisserie) chains through a covert alignment of professional self-presentation with those Greek traditions that have acquired a public face and are (potentially) globally mobile. The author, a native Thessalonikiote, fuses digital hermeneutics with phaneroscopy to explore this phenomenon from within.

KEYWORDS: Artisanship, Civilizing process, Hermeneutics, Internet, Migration, Travel, Orientalism
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The article examines how Prigipos, a cafe´ in the northern Greek city of Thessaloniki, communicates Greek cosmological themes through the way it ‘stages’ urban memories. The staging suggests an ‘Oriental’ tourist-like flaˆnerie that... more
The article examines how Prigipos, a cafe´ in the northern Greek city of Thessaloniki, communicates Greek cosmological themes through the way it ‘stages’ urban memories. The staging suggests an ‘Oriental’ tourist-like flaˆnerie that matches, and is directed towards the cafe´’s physical and symbolic surroundings (notably, the Turkish Consulate, the adjacent paternal house of Turkey’s first President, Kemal Atatu¨rk, but also the old part of the city, historically populated by Greek refugees from Anatolian
Turkey). My ethnographic eye is examined as constitutive of this flanerie, especially since I grew up in Thessaloniki. Through the employment of mixed research tools and methods, I explore how Prigipos’s spectacular self-presentation replaced old migrant
kafeneion culture with new aesthetic fusions to enable its global consumerist mobility. At the same time, the article argues that old ethno-national formulas are enmeshed in Prigipos’s design and narratives, endorsing a Thessalonikiote permutation of culture.

Keywords: cosmology, consumption, ethnographic travel, flaˆnerie, tourism, tourist gaze, methods,
Orientalism
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The role Western philhellenism played in the production of modern Greek identity has been the object of extensive research. Scholars focused on the importance Hellenic culture acquired in European discourses of modernity and the... more
The role Western philhellenism played in the production of modern Greek identity has been the object of extensive research. Scholars focused on the importance Hellenic culture acquired in European discourses of modernity and the maintenance of national and imperial self-images in the West. The present book re-conceptualises the historical emergence of such discursive frameworks as ‘gatekeepers’ hegemonic and counter-hegemonic projects. The specific context it explores is that of Anglo-Greek cultural exchange in the third quarter of the nineteenth century (1864-1881). It is argued that Greece’s ambiguous attitude toward British demands for Greek modernisation, and British frustration originating in modern Greek irredentism and internal disorder, define the frame of resistance. A consistent miscommunication between Greeks and Britons made co-operation impossible and assisted in the production of Greek counter-hegemony. The specific path of Greek modernisation, state, and nation-formation was developed in several key political/discursive conflicts around: (i) Crime and disorder, (ii) the rationalisation of historical past, and (iii) the nationalist project of the ‘Great Idea’.
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The paper explores how the Da Vinci Code, a novel by Dan Brown, and its cinematic adaptation (2006) operate as a ‘node’ for European capitalist networks of corporeal and virtual travel. Reexamining the convergence, as well as the... more
The paper explores how the Da Vinci Code, a novel by Dan Brown, and its cinematic adaptation (2006) operate as a ‘node’ for European capitalist networks of corporeal and virtual travel. Reexamining the convergence, as well as the divergence of patterns and practices of early travel and contemporary tourism, the paper discusses the centrality of technologies of “gazing” upon other cultures and of collecting cultural signs to the global networks of contemporary (digitized or corporeal) travel. It is argued that the film and the novel assist in the interpellation of a new type of traveler, what is termed here a neo-pilgrim. The mobilization of neo-pilgrimage by global tourist networks also indicates a kind of staged cosmopolitanism that originates in conceptions of the cosmopolitan as the epistemological subject of Enlightenment political philosophy. Contrariwise, however, the cosmopolitanism of the Da Vinci Code democratizes the consumption of what used to be regarded as high culture, reserved exclusively for the old, aristocratic, elites of Europe. It will be argued that the novel and the film break away from established codes of authorship in cultural production while debating the emergence of a new service class of professional travelers whose fleeting visits to museums, galleries, luxury hotels and boulevards operate as both unacknowledged touring of commoditised European heritage and an aspect of personal self-betterment and self-education.

Keywords: Cosmopolitanism, Democratisation, Europe, Heritage, Mobility, Neo-pilgrim, Tourist
Gaze, Travel
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The repressive mechanisms of collective memory have been the subject of a fierce debate in the human sciences - especially, but not exclusively, in the study of nationalism. This paper re-investigates the nature of national memory in the... more
The repressive mechanisms of collective memory have been the subject of a fierce debate in the human sciences - especially, but not exclusively, in the study of nationalism. This paper re-investigates the nature of national memory in the context of European nationalisms by drawing on contemporary national cases of remembering and forgetting. The explored instances are mobilized in the study of remembering/forgetting on a factual, rather than ideal level. Theoretically, it is argued that the Habermassian call for fostering ‘anamnestic solidarity’ with the past often fails in practice because of its normative undertones that disagree with Realpolitic demands. This is so because nationalist discourse, which serves to preserve the political interests of the national community, has to present itself to political forces that reside outside the community as a
closed, autopoetic system akin to that theorized by Niklas Luhmann. Although the Luhmannian thesis (which would gesture
towards the autonomisation of national memory) also fails to explain the nature of nationalist remembering/forgetting tout
court, it allows more space for an exploration of nationalist self-presentation than Habermas’ normative stance. The argument
in this study, which combines an appreciation of hermeneutics and autopoeia, is that the practice of (re)producing the
‘nation’s’ solitary amnesia enables nationalist discourse to respond to external political pressures. This presents the latter
as a dialogical/hermeneutic project despite its solipsistic ‘façade’.

Keywords: Collective Memory, Europe, Habermas, Hermeneutics, Luhmann, Nationalism
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This is a study of the phenomenon of ‘cinematic tourism’ through The Beach (2000), a cinematic adaptation of a novel that satirises the Western search for experiential authenticity through travel. It is argued that the film replicates... more
This is a study of the phenomenon of ‘cinematic tourism’ through The Beach (2000), a cinematic adaptation of a novel that satirises the Western search for experiential authenticity through travel. It is argued that the film replicates this quest for ‘authenticity’; international responses to it point in the same direction. The study explores how The Beach was used by Internet tourist providers for the promotion of Thailand as a travel destination, claiming that the adaptation was complicit in the advertising of the country as an ‘Edenic destination’ for Westerners. Finally, the paper follows the organisation of protests when 20th Century Fox decided to ‘conform’ the area in which the movie was filmed (Phi Phi Leh of Krabi area) to images of tropical tourist paradises.

KEY WORDS: Authenticity, cyberactivism, film, Thailand, travel, tourism
Theorising
The present article explores Hollywood narrations of Neohellenic and Mediterranean identity through a relatively recent film adaptation of Captain Corelli’s Mandolin by Louis de Bernières. It also looks at film reviews and other texts to... more
The present article explores Hollywood narrations of Neohellenic and Mediterranean identity through a relatively recent film adaptation of Captain Corelli’s Mandolin by Louis de Bernières. It also looks at film reviews and other texts to reflect critically on its reception by an international audience, and its relationship with the tourist industry. The theoretical trajectory of the analysis comprises a combination of Marxist theory and cultural studies. The chosen subject areas include representations of Mediterranean habitus, the uses of Greek landscape and folk culture and the strong association between historical narrative and stereotyping. An overall conclusion will suggest that most of these representations appeared in past Orientalist discourses. The contexts of late capitalist economy in which such discourses are mobilized invite scholars to examine affiliations between the tourist and the culture industries.

Key words
culture industry  film  Greece  Orientalism  ‘otherness’  Tourism
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Kidnapping is a crime that has not received due attention in sociological literature. Policy and risk assessment milieux discursively construct it as a ‘threat to society’, and administrative studies have focused on classifications that... more
Kidnapping is a crime that has not received due attention in sociological literature. Policy and risk assessment milieux discursively construct it as a ‘threat to society’, and administrative studies have focused on classifications that describe the phenomenon. The most widespread typology of kidnapping incidents takes as a starting point criminal motivation, producing a bipolar analysis of the crime as economic or political.This article re-examines classificatory and discursive approaches, placing emphasis on the social logic of kidnapping. It is argued that kidnapping presents all the characteristics of a rationalized system of exchange, based on rules and regulations reminiscent of legitimate business.The way that these regulations
are described by state authorities or private agents alike allow us an in-depth analysis of the crime itself.

KEY WORDS
exchange / kidnapping / organized crime / symbolic capital / terrorism / violence
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